The Mausolea & Monuments Trust

Belfast Castle Mortuary Chapel

Detached three-bay single-storey Gothic-style mortuary chapel with corner engaged octagonal bell tower and canted chancel. Pitched natural slate roof with masonry cross finial to gabled façade and metal cross finial to apse. Rock-faced masonry walls having cut-stone dressings including stringcourses and stepped buttresses.  Pointed arch window openings to nave having  tracery forming a bipartite arrangement.  Rose window to gabled façade. Trefoil-arch openings to belfry. Pointed arch door opening set within a cusped and sprocketed  gabled surround. 

Architect

Lanyon, Lynn & Lanyon

Listing

Grade B* (Northern Ireland)

Year Built

1896

Style

Gothic Revival

History

The mortuary chapel was built by the third Marquis of Donegal to designs by Lanyon, Lyn & Lanyon, as a memorial to his son Frederick Richard, the Earl of Belfast, who died in Naples, Italy in 1853. The Earl's body, along with four other family members which had been buried in the old family vault in St Nicholas’ Parish Church in Carrickfergus where later transferred to the chapel upon its completion in 1869. Ownership of the chapel transferred to the Church of Ireland in 1938 renaming it the ‘Chapel of Resurrection’.  The structure remained in use as a place of worship until the early 1970s. The bell was refurbished at the end of the Second World War, in honour of the Allied Victory. Following decommisioning of the chapel in 1972 a white marble monument of the young Earl being mourned by his mother was moved to Belfast City Hall. The chapel has since passed into the hands of a private developer.

Condition

Poor state of repair and heavily vandalised. Listed on the NI Buildings at Risk Register.

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Location

578 Antrim Road,
Belfast,
County Antrim

BT15 5FS

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